Collection: Part Two

Reflection (Vessel)

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Curving and Adding parts

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I wanted my vessel to portray the varying aromas, flavours, tones and shapes of different coffee beans. Though for consumers of coffee, the coffee they drink themselves may not make a significant difference from one to the other, the places the beans originate from hold a wealth of vibrant contrasting culture and tradition, whether they are from Etiopia, Columbia, Vietnam, Brazil, Kenya etc. 

The moulds that we had access to were limited in terms of shapes and size, however after a couple of trial and experiments, I gradually discovered ways to manipulate this. This could be done through squashing a plain plate shape to make an entirely new shape that resembles something organic, or curving some of the smaller pieces and putting them together with a larger clay piece to from untraditional shapes. 

 

On the second day of using the workshop, I took a more focused approach. Because I wanted my vessels to represent the coffee beans that have similar aesthetics but different geographical and cultural backgrounds and flavours to them, I experimented with manipulating the texture of the ceramics whilst using the same mould. I dug with a knife, made marks with a pen or my fingers, scratched with a scalpel etc, and I was pleased with the outcome. Adding texture made each of my vessels unique and also gave it a hand-made aesthetic. This linked to the narrative of the personal background behind coffee beans, from production of the beans to the roasting, grinding and extracting of coffee into someone's cup that I wanted to portray. 

 

 

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Manipulating rigid and traditional forms - squashing

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